Archive for the Rick Rubin Category

Is there anything Rick Rubin can’t do? It’s been a good 15 years since Metallica started losing it, five since St. Anger helped globally popularize the idea of its retirement. Even the band – down Jason Newsted and awaiting ex-Suicidal Tendencies bassist Robert Trujillo’s absorption into the group – admitted that its last album, tunelessly pieced together from studio jams and group-therapy notes, had no songs. Lars Ulrich’s drums didn’t sound like drums any more. The new tunes were ignored on tour and the band members performed facing in four different directions. It was all but done. (more…)

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Here is some footage from the MissionMetallica.com page. Its the first taste of what we can expect from the site. It’s actually pretty damn cool to see the guys back at work and for the most part having fun. Lars talks to producer Rick Rubin about not using a click machine on a track ‘Hell and Back’ while recording the drums in a pretty funny clip. Though he is not totally happy with it, i think we can see that they are trying to be old school and really capture a raw live feel to the album, a big change from the cut and paste St. Anger. (more…)

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 The latest Metallica mega-producer Rick Rubin. From the Beastie Boys to Slayer to his landmark recordings with Johnny Cash, Rick Rubin has manned the boards for some of the most important albums of the past 20 years. The 2007 Grammy ceremonies saw him take home honors in no less than five categories, including “Producer of the Year, Non-Classical.” Most recently, he oversaw the recording of Jakob Dylan’s forthcoming solo album, Seeing Things. As shown by the list below, Rubin’s all-time favorite albums run a gamut as broad as his production work.

1) The Beatles: The Beatles (white album)

“This one may not be as polished as some of the other Beatles albums, but I like how personal it feels, and the fact that you can hear the individual styles of each of the guys. It sounds as much like four separate people, as it does a band. I like seeing their individual personalities coming through in the music and in the playing.” (more…)

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