Archive for October, 2008

Play like a real guitar hero with the music to Death Magnetic. The matching folio to the highly anticipated CD by these heavy metal masters – the first to feature bassist Robert Trujillo, and the first produced by Rick Rubin. Includes artist-approved notes and tab for the hit single “The Day That Never Comes” and 9 more: All Nightmare Long * Broken, Beat and Scarred * Cyanide * End of the Line * The Judas Kiss * My Apocalypse * Suicide and Redemption * That Was Just Your Life * The Unforgiven III.

 Customer review:5.0 out of 5 stars excellent album – excellent book…, September 30, 2008 Real well laid out easy to read format – same as the other great Cherry Lane Metallica tab books. Not alot I can say really – is an excellent book – although if you were looking for some slightly ‘easier’ Metallica to start with you might want to look at the self titled/’Black’ album. If you’ve pretty much got grips with most of the likes of Master Of Puppets and all the other great Metallica albums you’ll really enjoy learning from this book – is really excellent…

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5 LP + CD Set    or   2 LP Set   or   Guitar Hero Version     Does vinyl really sound better?

The short answer is, “It depends.” That’s not a cop-out, because sound quality depends on how the music was originally recorded and mixed, not just on the medium (compact disc, MP3 file, vinyl album, 8-track tape, cassette) on which it is played.

Analog recording stores a sound wave on a physical medium (tape or the vinyl record), with minimal loss of information. Original sound is analog, and a vinyl record gets the listener as close to hearing that original sound as physically possible. But if the record gets scratched or dirty, it can distort and diminish the sound. Most music is recorded using digital technology, which means that the source information isn’t necessarily going to sound better when it’s played on an analog medium. (more…)

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The rock star insists the group has no plans to split in the near future, but touring will become a problem if he can no longer keep up.  

Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich fears his health will be the catalyst that eventually leads to the end of the heavy rock group – because he won’t be able to perform his high-energy routine as he ages.

The rock star insists the group has no plans to split in the near future, but touring will become a problem if he can no longer keep up.

He tells Rolling Stone magazine, “The Rolling Stones, Black Sabbath, Aerosmith, I have nothing but respect for their longevity but (Stones drummer) Charlie Watts isn’t playing Damage, Inc. three times a week or playing Whiplash every night.

“This (Metallica) has the potential to go on for a long time. But if somebody’s arm, back or neck just says, ‘F*** this,’ and quits, I don’t know…”

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Metallica has posted the following message online via their official website:

“We’re honored to be nominated by our friends at MTV Europe for two awards in the “Rock Out” and “Headliner” categories. The show will be broadcast live from the Liverpool Echo Arena in Liverpool, England on Thursday, November 6. We wish we could be there, but alas, we’re on tour in Omaha, NE that night!

“Between September 29 and November 2, YOU can vote at www.mtvema.com to decide who will win. Our fellow nominees between the two catagories include the Foo Fighters, Linkin Park, The Cure, Tokio Hotel, 30 Seconds to Mars, Paramore, and Slipknot.”

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Some Metallica fans are complaining that the band’s ninth studio record, ‘Death Magnetic,’ is — to borrow from Huey Lewis‘s ‘Back to the Future’ character — just too darn loud, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Since some folks might figure that the pioneering metal band’s recordings are supposed to be loud, this grievance warrants clarification. Metallica fans would never lament riffs’ being too brutal or vocals’ being too gravelly, but they are mourning the fact that the loud-soft dynamics and sonic richness found on the band’s seminal records are nowhere to be found on ‘Death Magnetic.’ The culprit? The increasingly common practice of extreme compression.

Compression, to oversimplify, is a studio process in which softly and loudly recorded sounds are brought to a more equitable level; sound waves that may resemble a stretched-out cotton ball are compressed to look more like a solid block. Intense compression jobs would result, for instance, in a song’s delicate bridge sounding just as loud as its bombastic chorus.

While engineers have long used compression to an extent (the reason that the yowls of Led Zeppelin‘s Robert Plant don’t come out distorted), the digital age of music has ushered in this more intense implementation.

Since many music listeners now use low-fidelity components (small computer speakers or headphones, for instance) to access low-fidelity files like MP3s, producers and mastering engineers have taken it upon themselves to ratchet up compression, making those measly sounds seem louder. (more…)

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We told you last week about a bit of a controversy surrounding the audio quality of the new Metallica CD, “Death Magnetic” and how some fans have started a protest petition against the “maxed out” and “distorted” mix. Now the man who gave us the “pots and pans” drum sound on the band’s last album has spoken out in defending the CD mix of the album.

“Listen, there’s nothing up with the audio quality,” Ulrich said in an interview. “It’s 2008, and that’s how we make records. (Producer) Rick Rubin’s whole thing is to try and get it to sound lively, to get it sound loud, to get it to sound exciting, to get it to jump out of the speakers. Of course, I’ve heard that there are a few people complaining. But I’ve been listening to it the last couple of days in my car, and it sounds f**kin’ smokin’.” Fans that disagree with this assessment have suspect some smokin’ had been going on in the recording studio and it has nothing to do with the sound. (more…)

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Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich has spoken out in an interview with Blender magazine about the controversy over the audio quality of the band’s new album, Death Magnetic. Some fans and publications have accused the group and producer Rick Rubin of mixing the album at such a loud volume that the music is distorted and difficult to listen to. Meanwhile, a number of fans have said online that they prefer the versions of the CD’s tracks prepared for the Guitar Hero video game, which are mixed differently.

Ulrich told Blender, “Listen, there’s nothing up with the audio quality. It’s 2008, and that’s how we make records. Rick Rubin’s whole thing is to try and get it to sound lively, to get it to sound loud, to get it to sound exciting, to get it to jump out of the speakers. Of course, I’ve heard that there are a few people complaining. But I’ve been listening to it the last couple of days in my car, and it sounds f***in’smokin.'”

Much of the actual recording and mixing was handled by engineer Greg Fidelman, who also worked with Rubin on Slipknot’s 2004 album, Vol. 3:(The Subliminal Verses). Ulrich explained Fidelman’s part in the process to us: “You know, Rick has a bunch of guys, like one does, and he’s kinda… you know, when we sat down with Rick to talk about what we wanted the record to sound like, we said our favorite record was the Slipknot record, in terms of the sounds. So we worked with Greg Fidelman and he’s been the — he’s the engineer, he’s the constant. He’s the nuts and bolts of the project and has really, I mean, he’s there every minute.”

Ulrich also told Blender, “The Internet gives everybody a voice, and the Internet has a tendency to give the complainers a louder voice… Part of being in Metallica is that there’s always somebody who’s got a problem with something that you’re doing: ‘(Frontman) James Hetfield had something for breakfast that I don’t like.’That’s part of the ride.” (more…)

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Metallica’s Death Magnetic is the best selling album in the country for the third week in a row, moving another 132,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan. Death Magnetic is only the second album this year to claim three straight weeks at #1, after Jack Johnson’s Sleep Through the Static managed the same feat in February. Metallica also held off budding Disney star Demi Lovato, who debuted at #2 this week with Don’t Forget, selling 89,000 units. Ne-Yo’s Year Of The Gentleman held on at #3, while Kings Of Leon scored their best charting and sales week ever as Only By The Night debuted at #4 with 74,000. The Pussycat Dolls’ sophomore set, Doll Domination, starts at #5 with 74,000.

The Top 10 also boasted two other debuts this week: R&B singer Jazmine Sullivan’s debut, Fearless, came in at #6 with 66,000, and another R&B singer, Joe, returns with Joe Thomas, New Man! at #8 with 54,000. The rest of the Top 10 was rounded out by Kid Rock at #7, Young Jeezy at #9 and Jonas Brothers at #10.

Other debuts this week came from TV On The Radio at #12 with Dear Science (their charting best), Jackson Browne’s Time the Conqueror at #20, Cold War Kids’ Loyalty to Loyalty at #21, Jenny Lewis’ Acid Tongue at #24 and David Gilmour’s Live in Gdansk at #26. Plain White T’s new disc, Big Bad World, bows at #33.

 

 

 

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